Apr 6, 2014/Julie

Baby Time

Waiting for Baby

We’re OPEN TODAY (April 6) with our usual business hours of 12-4PM and then we’re closing up for a few weeks maternity timeYou know, so I can go have a baby and start figuring out this new mama thing. Thank you all for sharing in my excitement as I’ve anxiously awaited this time. Your well wishes and understanding are very much appreciated. Thank you.

Stay tuned for a baby update as well as information about when Home Made will reopen with weekend hours.

P.S. Yes, we do have that very cute organic cotton Camper Rally fabric for sale in the Home Made shop. You should totally check it out when we reopen! I followed this tutorial to make a few handmade crib sheets for the nursery.

Mar 28, 2014/Julie

Waiting with Churros

Churros Scarf Progress

This waiting to go into labor business is for the birds. I know, I know. My due date is a week away and first babies have a reputation for being fashionably late to the party. But, still! I’ve been pregnant FOR AGES already. . . For the last two weeks I’ve been adamant that I WILL have this baby sooner than later. I was convinced that if only I cleaned all my floors, made enough freezer meals, went for regular walks, planned out the summer’s class projects, and finished my taxes this baby would see that there’s really no reason for delay. My hospital bag is made and packed, little buddy!

Ah, but that’s not how it works. Clearly, I’m not running this show. What to do? Besides eat too many Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and daydream about new Spring sandals. . .  I’m focusing on my Churros Scarf, that’s what.

Churros is a beautiful new scarf pattern from Manos del Uruguay that uses their luscious Fino yarn. Fino is a fingering weight blend of extra fine merino and silk. With a bit of sheen, a ton of squishiness, and a gorgeous tonal color variation, this is definitely one of my favorite yarns to wrap myself in. So, I knew I had to make the Churros scarf when I saw Manos released it in their collection of spring patterns. You might remember the Pluma Shawlette I made last year.

The Churros scarf is made with a two-color brioche stitch which is really, really fun to knit. You’re essentially knitting the front once with each color and then flipping to work the back with each color, creating a reversible scarf. Have you knit the brioche stitch before?

I’m just over halfway finished this scarf so not much longer to go. Do you think THIS is what he’s waiting for? That my baby boy just needs me to finish this scarf and then he’ll grace us with his presence??? 

 

If you’d like to give this project a go on your own, I’ve got the pattern, yarn and knitting needles here in the Home Made shop for you. And, a heads up — I’m also putting together a workshop for May or June where I’ll teach you the two-color brioche stitch and get you started on your own Churros scarf. Get ready! (:

 

Mar 20, 2014/Julie

Wiksten Tank

Wiksten Tank Sewing Pattern

A handful of these tank tops, in various fabrics and prints, comprised my summer uniform last year. This very functional top is perfect for hot, humid months. It’s also great for layering under a cardigan when you’re anxiously awaiting the warmer months to arrive and want a new snappy Spring top to wear. Like now!

The Wiksten Tank is a downloadable sewing pattern that you can find right here. Once you print your pattern pages, you’ve got to tape them together. Not my favorite part either, but you only have to do this once. Just make sure you’re printing with borderless printing so everything is printed to the proper scale. Then, I recommend using pattern tracing material to trace your desired size from the original. That way you can roll up the original pattern print-out and save for later when you want to trace other sizes. Or, for when you decide to make the dress version of this wardrobe basic.

Wiksten Tank Detail

You can make this top in whatever fabric you choose–jersey, chambray, quilting cotton, voile. But, if you’re most familiar with medium weight quilting cottons like the ones I sell in the Home Made shop, you might find it easiest to use a quilting cotton to make your first tank. Once you learn the pattern, it will be much easier to switch it up and experiment with more delicate–and sometimes more slippery–fabrics that will offer a different silhouette. Especially if you’re a beginner sewer. For my pre-pregnancy self, I made my tanks in the medium size. I would sometimes wear this tank plain with a chunky necklace or with a skinny belt around the waist. Ah, it feels like ages ago that I was wearing cute, regular (aka non-maternity) clothes. Those were the days! Though, it won’t be too long before the Wiksten Tank and I are reunited but a girl can daydream. . .

I know this is a super basic top, but there’s something so satisfying about being able to make your own clothes. To wake up and decide, “hey, I want a new shirt” and then, instead of heading out to purchase one that was probably made in a faraway country of questionable quality, you hit the sewing machine and stitch up yourself a new shirt by the afternoon. Pretty darn cool if you ask me.

In addition to downloading your Wiksten Tank sewing pattern, you’ll need to grab 2 1/2 yards of fabric for the tank (or 3 yards fabric for the tank dress). Why so much? Well, you’re finishing the edges around your neckline and arms with bias tape which requires that you cut some of your pattern pieces on the diagonal. You’ll have some leftover fabric to add to your stash for a future project. How can that be a bad thing?

Will you give the Wiksten Tank a try? If you’ve been wanting to sew your own clothes, this is a great pattern to start with. You can do it!

 

All the supplies you need for making your own Wiksten Tank are sold at Home Made, including pattern tracing material, fabric, thread, sewing machine needles, pins, and other sewing accessories and tools. Stop on by!

Mar 13, 2014/Julie

Cargo Duffle

You know how you get certain project ideas in your head and they just won’t leave you alone? The Cargo Duffle, a free pattern by Anna of Noodlehead for Robert Kaufman, is one of those projects. As soon as I saw this bag back in October, I knew I had to have it. Specifically, I knew I had to have it as my going-to-the-hospital-to-have-a-baby bag. Shall we say it’s little advance reward for the labor of labor? Nothing wrong with aspiring to be a stylish mama!

The Cargo Duffle is pretty darn perfect for an overnight or weekend . . . → Read More

Mar 6, 2014/Julie

The Littles by Michael Miller Fabrics

{The Littles by Michael Miller House Designer : Little Sailboats in Navy, Little Anchors in Coral, Little Whales in Navy}

Little sailboats, little anchors, and little whales fill the latest fabric bolts to hit our shop’s shelves. The Littles come to us from Michael Miller Fabrics and are 100% premium medium weight quilting cotton. They are really stinkin’ sweet, don’t you think?

Here are a few project ideas to get you ready for summer vacations at our beautiful South Jersey seashore:

- Lazy Days Skirt and matching appliqué t-shirt or tank : After you grab your fabric, elastic + . . . → Read More

Mar 5, 2014/Julie

Kathadin Hat : A Complimentary Knit Workshop for March

New things are less scary when you’ve got a few buddies to tag along and tackle them with you. No? And, trying out new stuff is also way less scary when we’re offering to get you started on your way. So, get ready to kick your knitting skills up a notch this month because we’ve got another complimentary knitting workshop coming up real soon! This workshop is free with purchase of materials in the Home Made shop.

On Wednesday, March 19 from 6 – 8 PM, we’re offering to get you started on your own Kathadin hat — a stylish, . . . → Read More

Feb 28, 2014/Julie

It’s Cool to Craft

{Photo by Dorothy Sheehan for The Press of Atlantic City}

Last week, we were lucky enough to have a reporter visit from The Press of Atlantic City. And, the article hit the press the very next day!

In the article, the reporter talked about how there’s been a resurgence of craft — hobbies that many people used think were reserved for “grandma” figures are now being embraced by younger generations. With so much of what we do online and intangible, it can be really grounding and reassuring to hold fabric or yarn in . . . → Read More

Feb 27, 2014/Julie

Sweater Obsession

{Flax sweater pattern from Tin Can Knits + Camper Rally fabric from Birch Fabrics}

Okay, I am in an official time out from knitting baby sweaters. For a little boy to be born around April 5, how many does he really need for his first 6 months of life??? You might think the answer is “just a few” since Spring and Summer will be here before we know it. But, I will argue that the actual answer is that “you can never have enough hand knit baby things”. Especially when they’re made by an expectant mama. The current count . . . → Read More

Feb 26, 2014/Julie

Clementine by Ana Davis

{From the Clementine collection by  Ana Davis for Blend Fabrics : Clementine Ticking in Taupe, In the Orchard in Ivory, Spoonful of Sugar in Taupe + Kiss the Cook in Ivory}

Despite the snow flurries that are still sprinkling down, I’m determined to keep the Spring vibe going here in the shop with some more new fabrics. Fresh-picked fruits, pots and pans, and silverware make up the unique farm to table charm in this new collection by Ana Davis for Blend Fabrics.

As usual, Blend brings us the softest premium quilting cottons to use for whatever you might be . . . → Read More

Feb 20, 2014/Julie

Meadow by Leah Duncan

For a while there it was starting to feel like Spring would never come. But, with some of this recent sunshine and warmer temperatures, I’ve been able to open up the windows to let some fresh air in. Boy does it feel good. Though, I can’t give this lil’ bit of sunshine all the credit for my more upbeat mood.

Along with the sunshine, Leah Duncan’s newest fabrics from her Meadow collection also arrived this week! My moods have always been affected by color so adding this new batch of fabrics inspired by fresh air, meadows, . . . → Read More

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